TWU PROTESTS IN MELBOURNE AFTER SURVEY FINDS 75% OF DELIVERY RIDERS PAID BELOW THE MINIMUM WAGE – DEMANDS ACTION

January 31, 2018

FOOD DELIVERY WORKERS ARE BEING EXPLOITED – RIGHT NOW AS YOU READ THIS ARTICLE.

AND IF YOU ORDER YOUR DINNER TO BE DELIVERED TONIGHT BY UBER EATS, DELIVEROO OR FOODORA – THERE IS A 75% CHANCE THE PERSON HANDING IT OVER WILL BE PAID BELOW THE MINIMUM WAGE.

The TWU is calling for urgent regulation of the on-demand economy after a survey showed three out of every four food delivery riders are paid below the minimum award wage.

We are fighting not only for these workers today, but to ensure a fair system for all workers in the future.

The survey also showed almost 50% said they or someone they know has been injured doing their job, which provides no sick pay or work cover. Over 70% of riders said they should get entitlements such as sick leave. The survey shows one in four delivery riders work full-time hours while over 26% work more than 40 hours a week.

“This is a damning indictment of the abuse of workers in Australia today. Wealthy companies are engaging in wage theft, ripping workers off, leaving them without compensation when they get injured and not paying their superannuation. These riders are crying out for guaranteed hours, fair rates of pay, rain gear, work cover, sick pay and insurance for their bikes. The Federal Government may think this way of engaging workers is ‘exciting’ but the survey today shows the levels of exploitation which exist in the on-demand economy,” said TWU National Secretary Tony Sheldon.

This is wage theft at its worse!

The TWU today joined delivery riders, the ACTU, Victorian Trades Hall and Unions NSW to formally kick-start a campaign for rights in the on-demand economy. READ MORE

Speakers at the launch included bike couriers, Victoria Minister for Industrial Relations Natalie Hutchins, Labor Employment spokesman Brendan O’Connor, TWU National Secretary Tony Sheldon, Prof Joellen Riley of Sydney Law School, and Dr Jim Stanford of the Centre for Future Work.

A protest was then held in Melbourne to highlight the issue.

Click to watch TWU (Vic/Tas Branch) Secretary John Berger and TWU Federal Secretary Tony Sheldon addressing the protest. 

“We need to make sure we are representing all of the workers in this industry that are being exploited even as we speak right now.  This is a critical step in our campaign and the first opportunity that we have had to come out into the public and let people know we are not happy about the way these people are being treated.

“It is up to us to take a stand against this exploitation.”

– TWU (VIC/TAS BRANCH) SECRETARY JOHN BERGER.

Watch a video of the protest.

Pay rates for delivery riders fall well below transport award rates, which cover bike couriers. Several bike couriers are on rates and conditions higher than the award, after staff successfully negotiating alongside the TWU with transport companies employing them.

Delivery riders spoke out about safety during survey interviews: “My friend was in an accident with a taxi driver and got a broken bone,” said one UberEats rider. “I get hit nearly once a week,” said a Deliveroo rider. “I’ve had minor injuries – I have been ‘doored’ twice by cars” said an UberEats rider.

The survey responses involve 160 delivery riders responding online and during face to face interviews conducted in Melbourne and Sydney in recent weeks.

For the survey result: www.twu.com.au/on-demand-workers-survey

Every single person performing food delivery work needs rights and protections.

It can be a dangerous profession and, whether you undertake work for UberEATS, Foodora, Deliveroo or any other provider, you deserve a fair deal that guarantees you will arrive home safely at the end of each shift.

But it won’t just happen. We need to get together and join forces to win.

 

 

 We have also created a facebook page – share it with your colleagues and tell them what the TWU plans to do to help food delivery workers and email ondemand@twu.com.au if you have any questions.

 

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